health benefits of cinnamon
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A spice known as cinnamon is produced from the inner bark of trees. Lattes and toast frequently contain the spice cinnamon. But for thousands of years, traditional medicines all around the world have also employed extracts from the cinnamon tree’s bark, leaves, flowers, fruits, and roots. Yes, there are many health benefits of Cinnamon and it is a common addition to meals and is used in baking and cooking.

Since 2000 BC, people have used and valued cinnamon, first in Ancient Egypt. It was used by physicians to treat ailments like coughing, arthritis, and sore throats during the Middle Ages. It is currently the second most popular spice in the US and Europe, right behind black pepper.

Here let us explore all about Cinnamon – the types, health benefits, types, nutrition facts, and side effects

Types of Cinnamon

There are four main varieties of cinnamon. The variety of cinnamon that is most frequently sold in the US is cassia, which is darker. Southeast Asia is where it is farmed. True cinnamon, commonly referred to as Ceylon cinnamon, is widely utilized outside.

There are two main varieties of cinnamon: Ceylon and cassia, or a combination of the two. Ceylon is simpler to grind, but it could not offer the same health advantages.

Health Benefits of Cinnamon

Cinnamaldehyde is one of the most significant active components of cinnamon. It is used in flavorings and scents. It might be the cause of some of cinnamon’s conceivable health advantages.

Cinnamon may benefit diabetics, according to some research. Cinnamon may reduce blood sugar, according to a study of 18 studies. However, hemoglobin A1C, a marker of blood sugar levels over time, was unaffected.

In diabetics, it may also decrease cholesterol. Numerous studies lack information about the sort of cinnamon they used or have other issues that cast doubt on the accuracy of their conclusions.

According to one analysis, cinnamon may aid in reducing obesity and weight gain. It is occasionally used to treat irritable bowel syndrome as well as other digestive and intestinal problems. But its effectiveness is unclear. Cinnamon contains antioxidants that have anti-inflammatory properties that may help reduce your risk of disease.

Cinnamon has also been said to be beneficial for:

  • Heart disease
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Cancer
  • HIV
  • Infection
  • Tooth decay
  • Allergies

Cinnamon does have anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and antioxidant effects, but there isn’t yet enough research to demonstrate how effectively it works in humans. Cinnamon use in moderation is unlikely to have a significant negative effect on your health. Eating excessive amounts of it is also not recommended.

Cinnamon Side Effects

  1. Cinnamon does have anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and antioxidant effects, but there isn’t yet enough research to demonstrate how effectively it works in humans. Cinnamon use in moderation is unlikely to have a significant negative effect on your health. Eating excessive amounts of it is also not recommended.
  2. Consuming excessive amounts of cassia cinnamon may be harmful, particularly if you have liver issues. Children, pregnant women, and nursing mothers should not use cinnamon as a treatment due to the lack of safety data.
  3. If you have diabetes and take cinnamon supplements, you may need to change your course of treatment. Cinnamon may influence your blood sugar.
  4. Before beginning to use supplements containing cinnamon, discuss with your doctor whether you routinely take any medications. They may alter how antibiotics, diabetes medications, blood thinners, heart medications, and other medications function.

Cinnamon Nutrition

Perhaps you have never considered cinnamon’s nutritional value. It is true that cinnamon doesn’t contribute significantly to your overall nutrition because it doesn’t include much protein or fat. The following vitamins and other nutrients are present in trace amounts in a teaspoon of ground cinnamon, though:

  • six calories
  • 0.1 grams of protein
  • 0.03 grams fat
  • 2 grams carbs
  • 1 grams fibre
  • 26 milligrams of calcium are present.
  • 11 milligrams potassium.

Nutrition Facts of Cinnamon

20 calories, 6 grams of carbohydrates, and 4 grams of fiber are contained in one tablespoon of cinnamon. Despite having a relatively low protein and fat content, it is an excellent source of numerous micronutrients like calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, and potassium.

Because cinnamon is so versatile in cooking, you might not notice a significant nutritional benefit from it. Instead of relying entirely on cinnamon to provide these benefits, including a range of other foods rich in micronutrients in your diet.

Also, check out all the other Healthy Spices from the Health Views Online directory.